rah-bop:

eskiworks:

rah-bop:

GOOD NEWS, EVERYONE

This weekend I finally finished setting up an online store. Now you too can buy prints of tiny fish paintings! I am still working on a solution for selling originals but I currently have no originals available anyway, so one thing at a time I guess.

I will continue uploading art as I can. In the meantime, if there is something specific you are looking for, please feel free to drop me an ask about it whenever!

YESSSS my favorite art available in HUGE ASS PRINTS thank you Rah!  <3

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The hugest ASS PRINTS money can buy!*

*probably not actually the hugest ass prints**
**no actual ass prints for sale, just dragon and fish prints mostly

Reblogging for PATAGIUMS ass tattoo.

indefenseofplants:

I don’t know about you, but I find indoor gardening to be just as satisfying and intellectually stimulating as any amount of outdoor gardening. Coming from a temperate climate, I don’t think I would be able to survive the long winters if itwere not for my house plants. The benefits to keeping plants in the home as well as the office are numerous and range in spectrum from improving air quality to diminishing stress and aiding in healing. 

Few would probably argue that a room with plants in it feels far more lived in and hospitable than an empty, sterile room. It makes sense. We evolved, like everything else on this planet, in a natural setting filled with seemingly countless numbers of different plant species. It should be no surprise that our minds would be more at ease the more natural any environment seems. Studies have shown that in an indoor work environment, offices that contained plants had statistically significant reductions in employee discomfort, stress, and an increase in their overall well being. It doesn’t end at work either. Hospitals and other medical facilities also showed that overall well being improved both physically and mentally with their residents. In patients suffering from dementia, indoor plants are said to “stimulate residents’ senses, created positive emotions, and offered opportunity for rewarding activity.” 

Plants do so much more than just improve our moods and reduce stress, they also clean the air we breath. Many every-day household items off-gas some pretty nasty chemicals. Insulation, particle board, PVC and vinyl, carpets, flooring, even our own clothing, all of these things come with their own gaseous and particulate chemical cocktails. It has been shown time and time again that many species of commonly kept house plants help to remove these toxins from the home environment. Some species are better than others. For instance, spider plants (genus Chlorophytum), are exceptionally good at removing formaldehyde compounds in the air. A room full of plants also exhibits statistically significant reductions in particulate matter as well as a measurable increase in humidity levels.

Whether they make you feel at ease or because they clean the air you breath, having house plants is a good thing. There are many species that are available both in nurseries as well as online. Some of the best plants for the home are also the most sensibly priced. Get online and do some research. There are a lot of easy plants to care for out there if you don’t necessarily have a green thumb. 

www.facebook.com/indefenseofplants



Further Reading:
http://www.karger.com/Article/Fulltext/24583

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02858837#page-1

http://www.actahort.org/books/639/639_8.htm

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/42/3/581.short

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925400502004549

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/1352231095004653

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0269749189900924

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs001289910044?LI=true#page-1

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11270-006-9092-3#page-1

http://www.mnn.com/health/healthy-spaces/photos/15-houseplants-for-improving-indoor-air-quality/a-breath-of-fresh-air

Indoor plants are wonderful. I need them or I would explode. It’s especially awesome that you can have all sorts of exotic, non-native species in your home without the worry of them becoming invasive or cause ecological problems (the way planting some non-native plants outdoors does!).

hookteeth:

Commissions!

Opening up some sketch commissions for the time being, as I need to start making a bit of money. Offering primarily digital headshot sketches, or more detailed pen work full body sketches. Dragons, monsters and ‘creatureish’ humanoids only (I do not yes feel as competent with my humans).

If you are interested throw me an ask or a message and I’ll send you my email for further communication, since tumblr messaging is clunky as heck. (Or just email me directly at mharaid@hotmail.co.uk)

Five slots will be open initially:

  1. -
  2. -
  3. -
  4. -
  5. -

Further terms and details under the cut.

Read More

So I just wanted to mention, that commissioning Slee is a really solid investment in your future.

You will be so happy.
Especially if your character is spinedly or dragonish or fangorious.

A few lovey chicken moments. Poor rumplequeen Moa is molting, and was looking for reassurance from me. She often rests her beak against my nose. (note: chickens CAN peck and injure your eyes, use extreme care, I know Moa very well and she is my only hen that does not peck at our faces from time to time)
Coho and my husband eldarath enjoy a moment together in the afternoon sun. She really, really likes him (so do I).

Some of my sweet chicken childrens.
Funny note— half of my flock is molting (badly) right now. The photo of Willow with the aster flowers is sort of a happy accident; the asters cover her naked shame. You can see part of her bare neck peeking out if you look hard enough. It’s okay, Willow, you will look beautiful again soon!

Do you have any tips or tricks for drawing dragon wings in any folded/half foldes pose? I find the wing skin folds to be the most difficult thing when drawing dragons, they usually cover up half the image and just look wonky when I try ;w;
Anonymous

rah-bop:

Alright, you’re about to see some diagrams that are not 100% biologically accurate but hopefully they’ll illustrate my points. Also, most of this I am basing on bat wings because that’s the closest real life reference we have to dragon wings. 

OKAY. 


First let’s talk about what’s going on with the edges of the wing membrane. The whole membrane is like one giant stretchy piece of spandex. When all the digits are extended the membrane gets stretched taut, but when the wing relaxes the membrane retracts into itself. What does this look like?

image

The edges pull inward, like this. 

What they don’t do is fold up like a piece of fabric. 

image

The very edge of the membrane often has a tiny ridge. This is caused by the folding of the skin, as well bundles of elastin fibers that we won’t get into right now! On occasion there will be some wrinkles, but they are generally on the membranes themselves and don’t present themselves much along the edge. 

image

Check out these wrinkles here. The pink arrow shows a pretty “large” wrinkle, which is present on the plagiopatagium (membrane between the body and the last digit of the wing hand.) This is a very large piece of skin, so if there are going to be any large wrinkles they will be here! But even still, it’s not nearly as extreme as the floppy “fabric” example I drew above. 

image

Here you can see more wrinkles on the wing surface that don’t really express along the edge nearly as much as you might expect. All things considered, they’re pretty subdued!

image

This wing is half-folded and it still just looks like big smooth shapes. They have to get pretty darn folded before wrinkles start happening. Until then, the edges of the wings are just gentle curved lines. Nothing to worry about!

As for poses, remember that a dragon wing is just like your arm. It has a shoulder, an elbow, a hand, and fingers. They are just really elongated versions of each. Just like on your hand, the fingers are flexible and can bend at the joints. Here are three quick steps for drawing crazy wing poses:

1. Sketch out the arm and finger parts. 

2. Draw a deeply curved line to represent the edge of the wing membrane (blue.) Also draw curved lines between each pair of knuckles (pink.) This will help you see where that membrane is going. 

3. Erase the parts that are invisible from the viewer’s angle. 

image

This was kind of just a fast overview. I hope it answered your question, and if it didn’t, shoot me another note and I’ll try to be more thorough! 

Rah explains dragon wings. Patagiums are important!

duckstampadventure:

Yesterday, Dave Goyer (vice president of the National Duck Stamp Collectors Society) was kind enough to send me a few things in the mail— including a copy of the Federal Duck Stamp Contest program from this year! This is a really cool thing for me to have, since I was unable to attend in person. On page three, it lists some statistics about this year’s contest; namely, it gives a breakdown of where the entries are from, what medium they are painted in, age of artist, etc. I thought I’d share it here with you, for anyone else that did not attend and might be curious to see these statistics.
At the risk of sounding like an idealist, I’d love to see more entries overall, especially from lesser represented groups! Now, this is a bit counter-intuitive as a competing artist… less entries means less people to compete against, right? Well, yes. That is true. And it is also true that it can be overwhelming (as a judge) to try to select the ‘best’ when you are looking at a field of hundreds of paintings. But… I have a great deal of concern that the interest in the contest is waning. For whatever reason, less artists are “into it” than anytime in recent history that I am aware of. Did you know that in the past ( I am looking at the late 1980’s and early 90’s) that thousands of artists entered every year? In 1987, the year that Daniel Smith won with his beautiful painting of a snow goose, he was one of over a thousand entries. 
If you are an artist, maybe you will consider entering? It is a tough competition, but the excitement, enjoyment of painting, the finding of new friends… the comradery and feeling of being part of something big, is pretty amazing. I have made some really fantastic friends and met a lot of cool people through this, way before I managed to win this thing! 
Paint a duck, help a duck, make some friends, have fun, and keep the program going. If you need help, my time is thin this year, but I can try to assist!
A Ducky Schedule
I have received my tentative schedule of events for the coming year. Some of the dates and locations are To Be Determined, and I may attend additional events. To be sure, I will be doing some smaller events, talks, and programs so stay tuned for that.  I hope you might come see me if I end up at an event near you!
November 13-16, 2014: Easton, MDEaston Wildfowl FestivalLook for me mostly at the Federal Duck Stamp Office booth!
November 21-23, 2014: Redlands, CADuck Stamp Art at the San Bernardino County Museum
April 17, 2015: Shepherdstown, WVJudging of the Jr. Duck Stamp Competition
June 26, 2015: Location TBDFirst Day of Sale Event
July, 2015: Olean, NYHometown Celebration
September 25 &amp; 26, 2015, Location TBDJudging of the Federal Duck Stamp
(cross-posted to Blogger, where the comments make sense)

 I promise I will not infinitely reblog this stuff, I just want to make sure everyone that has AN INTEREST in this sort of stuff gets a chance to see it and/or follow the Duck Stamp Adventure Blog. Because this stuff is super important and I WANT TO MAKE HISTORY WITH YOU ALL &lt;3I have always been very shy about promoting myself, but this is bigger than I am. This is a government program that actually works, and does real, tangible good for wildlife and habitat and plants and birds and bees and little wigglies in the swamp, and yes, even humans that like to drink water.If you don&#8217;t love ducks and wetlands and birds, who even are you? WHO ARE YOU

duckstampadventure:

Yesterday, Dave Goyer (vice president of the National Duck Stamp Collectors Society) was kind enough to send me a few things in the mail— including a copy of the Federal Duck Stamp Contest program from this year! This is a really cool thing for me to have, since I was unable to attend in person. On page three, it lists some statistics about this year’s contest; namely, it gives a breakdown of where the entries are from, what medium they are painted in, age of artist, etc. I thought I’d share it here with you, for anyone else that did not attend and might be curious to see these statistics.

At the risk of sounding like an idealist, I’d love to see more entries overall, especially from lesser represented groups! Now, this is a bit counter-intuitive as a competing artist… less entries means less people to compete against, right? Well, yes. That is true. And it is also true that it can be overwhelming (as a judge) to try to select the ‘best’ when you are looking at a field of hundreds of paintings. But… I have a great deal of concern that the interest in the contest is waning. For whatever reason, less artists are “into it” than anytime in recent history that I am aware of. Did you know that in the past ( I am looking at the late 1980’s and early 90’s) that thousands of artists entered every year? In 1987, the year that Daniel Smith won with his beautiful painting of a snow goose, he was one of over a thousand entries. 

If you are an artist, maybe you will consider entering? It is a tough competition, but the excitement, enjoyment of painting, the finding of new friends… the comradery and feeling of being part of something big, is pretty amazing. I have made some really fantastic friends and met a lot of cool people through this, way before I managed to win this thing! 

Paint a duck, help a duck, make some friends, have fun, and keep the program going. If you need help, my time is thin this year, but I can try to assist!

A Ducky Schedule

I have received my tentative schedule of events for the coming year. Some of the dates and locations are To Be Determined, and I may attend additional events. To be sure, I will be doing some smaller events, talks, and programs so stay tuned for that.  I hope you might come see me if I end up at an event near you!

November 13-16, 2014: Easton, MD
Easton Wildfowl Festival
Look for me mostly at the Federal Duck Stamp Office booth!


November 21-23, 2014: Redlands, CA
Duck Stamp Art at the San Bernardino County Museum

April 17, 2015: Shepherdstown, WV
Judging of the Jr. Duck Stamp Competition

June 26, 2015: Location TBD
First Day of Sale Event

July, 2015: Olean, NY
Hometown Celebration

September 25 & 26, 2015, Location TBD
Judging of the Federal Duck Stamp

(cross-posted to Blogger, where the comments make sense)

 I promise I will not infinitely reblog this stuff, I just want to make sure everyone that has AN INTEREST in this sort of stuff gets a chance to see it and/or follow the Duck Stamp Adventure Blog. Because this stuff is super important and I WANT TO MAKE HISTORY WITH YOU ALL <3

I have always been very shy about promoting myself, but this is bigger than I am. This is a government program that actually works, and does real, tangible good for wildlife and habitat and plants and birds and bees and little wigglies in the swamp, and yes, even humans that like to drink water.

If you don’t love ducks and wetlands and birds, who even are you? WHO ARE YOU

A Day with a Printer

duckstampadventure:

After realizing my stamp win, I was left with more questions than answers. A big one was, essentially, “What am I responsible for, now?”

Read More

(video http://youtu.be/5DLAWRlkKsw )

Today is national coffee day! ON THIS DAY, DID YOU KNOW…
The world’s love of coffee runs deep:

  • The International Coffee Organization estimates that people consumed 7.8 billion kilograms of coffee in 2008.
  • More than half of all Americans over the age of 18 — 107 million people — drink coffee daily.
  • Coffee is the world’s second-most-valuable commodity exported by developing countries, after oil. (think about this)
  • The global coffee industry earns an estimated $60 billion annually but less than 10 percent of those earnings end up in the hands of coffee farmers. Although the fair trade coffee (coffee that is sustainable and pays a fair price to farmers) market is on the rise, it constitutes only two percent of the world’s coffee supply.
  • Most of the original forests have been cut down for coffee monoculture crops in climates where coffee grows best.
  • The deforestation contributes to global warming as the trees are cut and burned, releasing carbon. Additionally, as trees are lost, the ecosystem is losing is capacity to sequester carbon. As you can imagine, these lost habitats should be supporting a ton of animals, including migratory birds.
  • Shade-grown (bird-friendly) Coffee can support habitat protection for hundreds of bird species.


Our choices as consumers can have a direct impact on the survival of a declining species and a disappearing ecosystem. If you can afford it, consider seeking out shade-grown/bird friendly coffees (even better if they are also fair trade!). I am drinking some right now, and honestly it is delicious and really not much more expensive than any other premium coffee.

Some Sauce: https://www.fws.gov/northeast/climatechange/stories/warbler.html

What the hell are all these labels? http://blog.allaboutbirds.org/2012/10/09/making-sense-of-coffee-labels-shade-grown-organic-fair-trade-bird-friendl/

Etc http://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/coffee/

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: a group of Ocean Sunfish

vantid vantid vantid vantid vantid

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: a group of Ocean Sunfish

vantid vantid vantid vantid vantid

I DONE MADE A TUMBL BLOG ABOUT THE THING THAT IS HAPPENING TO ME.

Please follow if you are at all into duck stamps, conservation, ruddy ducks, strange people in the woods that like chickens, or just want to support me. THANKS I LOVE YOU

Just a reminder that tomorrow, Saturday, September 27, entrance to all national parks and national wildlife refuges is free, because of National public lands day.

GO OUTSIDE

How I won the Federal Duck Stamp- A big long journal entry

Oh gosh. Okay. Where to start?
I guess I better start at the beginning. I want to document this, lest I forget. It will be fun to look back upon these words, someday.

Read More

Moa and her Glorious Rumplecomb

Behold the rumplecomb. Bask in its splendor! The “S” curve in the front stands for Stink. Big Stink, to be exact. She is also known as The Big Stink.
You must whisper “Big Stiiiiink” into her face, for she IS the Big Stink, and she will whisper the secrets of the universe back to you. Then snuggle into your lap. Please pet her keel. Please pet it. The rumplecomb demands.